How well do you know plagiarism?

Take this quick 10-question quiz to find out!

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Instructions:

Once you've answered each question, click "Check Answer" to see the correct answer, and "Next" to move onto the next question. At the end, click "Finished?" to see how well you did.

1








  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    Plagiarism is essentially taking an existing work and passing it off as original without crediting the source. All of the above are considered plagiarism (as a manifestation of plagiarism or as a definitional rewording).

  • 2


  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    No. There is a common misconception among students that adding quotation marks around a paragraph is enough to show proper attribution. To show proper attribution, a writer must put quotation marks around the paper and add a corresponding reference in MLA, APA, or other accepted format.

  • 3




  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    Summarize the text in your own words and cite it. Proper paraphrasing requires writing an original summary, and following it up with proper citation--quotes and reference according to an acceptable citation format. Options A and B show how paraphrasing is often misinterpreted. Changing every few words is also detected by plagiarism software! As option C indicates, even if the text is completely changed, the idea came from another source, and that requires attribution.

  • 4


  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    Yes. Recycling writing as original work is called self-plagiarism. This is a grey issue that isn’t well-known or has clearly defined rules. While self-plagiarism may be crazy to some, it is an issue that centers on the responsibility of the writer to indicate that the material has been used before. The consequences of self-plagiarism may include copyright infringement or a violation of academic honor codes.

  • 5




  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    With an individual assignment, it is clear that any collaboration is unauthorized by the instructor. The real question is whether or not this situation can be classified as plagiarism or simply an act of academic dishonesty. The simple question that any writer should ask himself is: “Am I trying to pass off others’ work and taking credit for it as my own?” This situation becomes clearer in that respect. Chi and Juan are all passing off the research, the ideas and main findings as their own original work.

  • 6


  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    A misconception of social sites is that they don’t need to be cited or referenced because they are in the public domain and collaboratively created. Taking an idea or text from an original source means that proper citation practices must be followed to avoid plagiarism, no matter where it comes from. In addition, many instructors do not consider Wikipedia a reputable, academic source that provides credibility to a research paper.

  • 7


  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    No. According to Purdue Online Writing Lab, information can be classified as common knowledge if the same information is “undocumented in at least five credible sources”, if it is something that readers within a group or discipline are likely to understand, and if it is contained in a general reference source.

    Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/

  • 8


  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    Give credit. Taking someone’s ideas or words from Twitter or Facebook and posting it is your own is considered plagiarism.

  • 9



  • Check Answer

    Answer:

    The point of a reference is for other readers to be able to quickly look up and check the sources that they’ve used. Having inaccurate citation is essentially failing to properly document all your sources and correctly give credit where credit is due. In this case, there is plagiarism because the writer fails to attribute the work of the authors of the secondary source.

  • 10





  • Check Answer

    Finished?

    See your final score

    Answer:

    All of the above. These consequences demonstrate that plagiarism is a serious offense and should be avoided at all costs.

  • Your final score is:

    See where you rank below:

    9-10: Master

    You're a plagiarism expert! Continue writing originally and bolstering ideas with properly cited sources. Tweet how awesome you are and share it with your classmates, friends, or instructors!

    7-9: Pro

    You're a citation pro! It appears there are areas you could still brush up on to prevent plagiarism, but overall you have a good grasp on attribution and duplication. Here are some quizzes and exercises to challenge you:

    5-7: In-Training

    You’re still learning the ins and outs of plagiarism. You may know about plagiarism from school, but your understanding of proper citation practices and how to avoid plagiarism could be improved. To get a better understanding of what it takes to prevent plagiarism in your academic work, visit the following pages:

    1-5: Newbie

    According to your score, you may be in danger of plagiarizing. Don’t waste any time in learning more about plagiarism before you start writing your next essay! Check out these pages to help you:


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